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20130205
20130205
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
." and the age of aware just spawned the number of exotic religions, including zen buddhism and hindu meditation and from there into the jesus freak youth movement which swept through the ranks of the drug-depleted and sex-sated surfers of california and and from there into the jesus freak youth movement which swe . now, imam, do you detect any impact of the affluence of today on the spirituality of your -- your flock? >> indeed. i do believe that if i were to go back 20 years or see where muslims are going now, i do believe that the economic situation of muslims and the worldwide community will influence the way muslims see islam and see islam's spirituality as the way out of the dispair, out of the harmlessness, out of the -- homelessness and poverty that mums limbs have been experienced in the last 20 years. >> you serve as a muslim chaplain of georgetown university which is a roman catholic university in the sense it's run by jesuit priests, right? >> indeed, yeah. >> now, how is that going? >> i think it has gone, so far, very well. i have enjoyed working with the jesuits, with the roman ca
on kpix 5, it's changed everything. >> reporter: for this family, hinduism is more than a religion. it's a way of life. but following a recent flight, that life has been dramatically altered. >> i thought something suspicious. >> reporter: not normal because it was the first time this 34- year-old hindu ever tasted meat. >> there was nothing written on the sandwich. >> reporter: he confirmed via e- mail that his families meals would be meat-free. once on board, the flight attendant assured him again. but a few bites in, he noticed an unfamiliar taste. >> eating meat is considered violent. >> so this is a sin? >> a grievous sin. >> reporter: the professor explains that for some families, hindu families, eating meat is a sin. accidentally eating it can be devastating. she compares it to accidentally eating a pet. >> there's a sense of deep revolution. >> reporter: he prays daily for forgiveness. he can no longer eat with his family. he must now travel back to india to perform his penance. >> was it intentional? no. but it's gross neglige
somebody else's religion are somebody else's life. it's an area they voted to tax themselves we could have better health care and better schools. they look at washington and don't understand the fight in a lot of ways. >> host: specifically when it comes to technology related issues, do you hear anything that your constituency wants? >> guest: there is concern about innovation and the role that the current law has in the area in stifling innovation. that is difficult to remedy. we had a bill that i ended up not voting for last year having worked on it for 12 years that really didn't do what we had hoped it would do. we have got an overarching scheme on copyright enforcement that is probably not that positive in terms of technology innovation. i am sure you all remember the sofa brouhaha last year. we stop the overreach from the copyright board that the -- i'm not talking about the company's. i'm just talking about individuals who are inventing things and creating things feel that there is a problem in terms of the copyright regime and we come together and make sure that it works in the int
of their religion. by very credible reports the bureau of investigative journalism one of them over 100 people under the age of 18 killed in drone strikes in pakistan, a country we're not at war with. that's more than five nutans. where we have these debates and we can't have assault weapons and we're the number one global arms seller. we're taking the leading edge on the drone technology. we're regularly killing people in countries we're not even at war with. so i guess in this opaque system you talk about the legalities of it. it's about making laws so they can do what they want to do which they were doing any way. that i guess--i don't think that if you can rationalize killing anyone--unarmed kids because they happen to be near people you think are bad guys then i think you can rationalize basic basically killing anybody. >> you mentioned the numbers and we have the numbers for the audience right now. they're very telling. let's look at the first ten days of 2014. this is pakistan alone there were seven deadly strikes. at least 40 people killed. 11 of them may have been civilians. that's just an
that if they iewnd how god works they would know that. they are horrible at religion. >> i love that. if these stupid, grieving people would get it through their heads, he is a disgusting person. and i love the concept that god wouldn't kill people. there are seven stories that completely contridict that. i am pretty sure there has been a lot of killing throughout the years. innocent or guilty he is a more ron. >> that's a bold statement. >> he is a great man. >> why and he a great man? i am curious why you think that? >> because although i don't think he is guilty and he has denied it and there are a lot of people there and it doesn't make sense and that wasn't who the police were trying to get, by the way. they wanted him to testify against the other two so they didn't think he was guilty anyway. in any event he was hanging out with bad people and he had a bad life and he completely turned his life around and became this incredibly good person who gave so much to the man who died when he did not kill. >> that was called a settlement. >> apparently he was quite generous. he didn't fight it. he has a
of the kickoff changed. they're more aggressive penalties being called so the nfl really does have the religion now and it's a question of whether they can resolve this body of claims by the 4,000 former players, set those aside. deal with them in a straight-up way and then move ahead to try to make the game safer. >> paul barrett, thanks very much for injoing us. >> my pleasure. >> president obama weighed in. >> some of the concerns we have learned about have to give parents pause and, you know, as i said before, i feel differently about the nfl. these are grown men. pop warner high school, college. i want to make sure that we're doing everything we can to make the sport safer. >> so do you think we need to change the way the game is played in order to ensure player safety? peggy brand says, i think what the nfl is doing right now is a step in the right direction. i'm glad my son decided to stop playing in seventh grade. i probably want to ask him to stop. like us on facebook and join the conversation. >>> up next, undaunted. from the home front to the combat zone. the author whose stories of
together who did not usually come together. we were not bounded in a common race or religion. we are not a theocracy. we are not a minority. this nation was born with the ideals that a united people, but these ideals compel every generation to be more inclusive and welcoming. we realize this country was not a zero some political nation. in fact, the more we open up this country to inclusion, the better we are. women joining the work force has not diminished men. it expands our economy and opportunity for all. the education of poor people in the inner-city does not take away from others, it expands our economy and makes us all do better. this is the ideal of our country. as the rabbi would tell me, the jewish saying, that jews together are strong, but jews with other people are invincible. he african saying that spiderwebs united can tie up a line. the very principle of this country, one of my advisers told me one of the fundamental principles of islam. the oneness of the community. we recognize dependency and see strength. that became the problem solving idea that i took on. i be
and exclusion from any of the activities of the state? guest: i am not the kind of islamic or religion scholar, but as a muslim i would say what is against humanity is against -- is not accepted by me as a muslim and i us as muslims in afghanistan. we do have our own definition islam and democracy, but i think it is not the way that was somehow understood in general here. host: the world press freedom index that we showed earlier showed the united states 32nd and afghanistan 128. i want to take that question and ask that about afghanistan. who is restricting the press? guest: the problems we're facing in afghanistan when i am saying "we" it means media people and media community. inside the government of afghanistan sometimes, the people who are fighting with the government, taliban, for example, and some local governments across the country, these are the three main barriers that we are facing with all that we have the constitution, the article 34 is just granting access free media and freedom of information. the article 50 is granting access to information. all of the media [indiscernible] u
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)